Friends With Kids

Friends with Kids

Jennifer Westfeldt’s directorial debut, Friends with Kids, is a lighthearted romantic comedy with an indie sensibility striving to be something just a bit more but, inevitably, falling to all of the third act clichés that plague most romantic comedies.  A film basically about the way our relationships change when kids enter the picture, the film is charming if a little guileless and confused in thematic content.  The film follows a group of friends, all in different stages in their relationships and how they morph and change once they have kids.

The core of the film follows two best friends, played by Jennifer Westfeldt and Adam Scott, who decide to have a kid together without all of the mess associated with it like a relationship or marriage.  The rest of the ensemble is filled out with alumni from Bridesmaids – Maya Rudolph, Chris O’Dowd, Kristen Wiig, and Jon Hamm – a group of friends who end up having kids and, in effect, provide the best case for how having kids effects and strains romantic relationships.  Westfeldt and Scott’s characters’ platonic relationship works out pretty well until each strike out on their own romantic relationships with Edward Burns and Megan Fox, respectively.

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Tucker and Dale vs. Evil

Eli Craig’s Tucker and Dale vs. Evil is a sometimes clever, but mostly rote, horror comedy that takes the “kids going out to the cabin in the woods and facing hillbilly homicidal maniacs” genre of horror and subverts the entire concept to sometimes funny but in the end, tiring results.  On the film’s face, it’s a one note joke stretched out to feature-length and, unfortunately, that would be correct.  While the film’s two amicable leads, Tyler Labine and Alan Tudyk, give great comedic performances and have a great easygoing chemistry to their back and forth, the rest of the film hangs on a clever concept that is quickly diminished as the film goes along.

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21 Jump Street

21 Jump Street

Jonah Hill and Channing Tatum relive their high school days in the remake of the television show 21 Jump Street.  Filmmakers Phil Lord and Chris Miller surprise in a big way, taking this remake of an outdated television show from the 1980’s and properly updating it to modern times, telling a hilarious, lewd story about not just our regrets about our high school days but about the ways we have changed and the way today’s teenagers are quickly changing with the times.

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